Backyard Goat Farming Business

I was born and raised on a farm, and one of the many livestock that we grew were goats. These animals are easy to grow. They are fed by grass and water only. There is a minimal cost involved in raising them, but you will surely get good cash once sold. We grew only a few goats as it was not really our primary source of income.

The story that I’m gonna tell is not mine but of an OFW in Saudi Arabia. His name is Nelson Ilao. He has ventured into different businesses and investments, but one particular endeavor that he has been profiting is goat farming. Together with his friend, they started this business two years ago.

Nelson Ilao

I got a chance to interview Nelson via voice chat. I am grateful to get details that can be useful to many Filipinos who want to venture into this type of business. In this article, we will tackle how to grow goats in a backyard. This is a type of simple goat farming of around 20 goats in a herd.

Lot, Fence, & Shed

Nelson’s goat farm is a 300 square meter lot in Brooke’s Point, Palawan. He has initially grown rice but has seen a better potential in goats. This size of the land is enough to grow up to 20 goats.

Fencing is recommended in growing goats. If you let them roam astray, they will eat the surrounding plants that might upset other people. Using barb wire, you can create a perimeter fencing enough for goats to be kept inside. In Nelson’s case, they have used a precast concrete post to make a sturdy fence. He has spent around P50,000 in fencing. Although you can use bamboo or tree trunks as poles to save money. Or just use poles and bamboo stalks in fencing to reduce the cost.

A small shed (Kubo) has to be built as a resting place for your herd. This will protect them from the rain and extreme heat from the sun. It can be a simple hut made of bamboo or pole and nipa or cogon leaves as roofing.

Food & Caretaker

Goats graze on the grasses within the fence. They can also be fed by leaves of trees such as ipil-ipil, malunggay, acacia, coconut, and banana leaves. Daily freshwater feeding is required to grow a healthy goat.

You need only one person as a caretaker to manage this business. Salary can be given on a commission basis. If you have an unemployed relative, then it’s the right time to provide him with a source of income. This business is easy to run as it doesn’t require full-time attention from the caretaker. Goats just eat the grasses within the fence. The caretaker will only provide water to drink. Goats take themselves to shelter at night without the caretaker’s help.

Growing & Selling 

Any local goat breed can be used to start farming. Nelson has begun with 2 pairs of male & female goats for P8000. In just a year, it had grown into 20 goats.

A doe (female goat) reproduces twice in a year. It gives birth to usually a pair of kids (baby goats). It takes 6 to 8 months to grow a kid to maturity and is ready for selling. An adult goat can be sold on a local market. Nelson’s yearly net profit is P50,000 on average.

Conclusion

Many of us may have owned vacant lands that have been left unused. Rather than keeping them idle, you can make it productive by raising goats. For one, I have a coconut farm in Leyte that can also be used as a goat farm. You can pick a caretaker from an unemployed relative. You earn a profit at the same time helping others to make a living.

Disclaimer

EarnPeso holds no control over your financial fate. It is here as a guide. Exercise prudence in every investment or business you undertake, and success will follow.

I hope this article encourages you to start your own business/investment. Click the links for Business Ideas and Investment Options for more insightful essays.

Chat with me

I have ventured into an e-commerce business (online selling) that you might also be interested in setting up. You can visit our website at colibers.com, where you can have a chat with me (just select Contact Us), and I will be more than willing to entertain your questions regarding this post and e-commerce.

Author: Jundril Colita

Jundril Colita is a Filipino expatriate based in Dubai. An entrepreneur/investor and a minimalist who loves traveling.

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